spooky{abstr}action

September 27, 2014 at 4:11pm
3,859 notes
Reblogged from spacetravelco

spacetravelco:

Physics prints by Justin VanGenderen

Available here & here.

(via freshphotons)

July 12, 2014 at 1:14am
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Rafaël Rozendaal - Websites →

May 26, 2014 at 11:42am
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(via 2014 Finalists | Best Illusion of the Year Contest)

(via 2014 Finalists | Best Illusion of the Year Contest)

May 12, 2014 at 2:23am
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Octopuses have the largest brains of any invertebrate. Athena’s is the size of a walnut—as big as the brain of the famous African gray parrot, Alex, who learned to use more than one hundred spoken words meaningfully. That’s proportionally bigger than the brains of most of the largest dinosaurs. (via Inside the mind of the octopus | Orion Magazine)

Octopuses have the largest brains of any invertebrate. Athena’s is the size of a walnut—as big as the brain of the famous African gray parrot, Alex, who learned to use more than one hundred spoken words meaningfully. That’s proportionally bigger than the brains of most of the largest dinosaurs. (via Inside the mind of the octopus | Orion Magazine)

May 7, 2014 at 4:34pm
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Plastic Infinite (by Sculpture)

4:08pm
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The last dataset, which is not pictured because my camera ran out of batteries and my charger was at home represents all of the nuclear detonations in the world.

 (via World Data Crystals | Scott Kildall)

The last dataset, which is not pictured because my camera ran out of batteries and my charger was at home represents all of the nuclear detonations in the world.

(via World Data Crystals | Scott Kildall)

April 23, 2014 at 5:11pm
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There are three famous quotes that haunt me and guide me though my days. The first is from John Bradford, the 16th-century English reformer. In prison for inciting a mob, Bradford saw a parade of prisoners on their way to being executed and said, “There but for the grace of God go I.” (Actually, he said “There but for the grace of God goes John Bradford,” but the switch to the pronoun makes it work for the rest of us.) The second comes from Albert Einstein, who disparagingly referred to quantum entanglement as “spooky action at a distance.” And for the third, I go to Ice Cube, the chief lyricist of N.W.A., who delivered this manifesto in “Gangsta Gangsta” back in 1988: “Life ain’t nothing but bitches and money.

— Questlove on How Hip-Hop Failed Black America — Vulture

February 3, 2014 at 11:57pm
960 notes
Reblogged from proofsareart

proofsareart:

The image is not mine. It is a fantastic creation by bigblueboo that has caught some attention outside of the usual math tumblverse. You should definitely check out eir blog and if you like this post you should (also?) reblog the original. With that out of the way:

Modeling. Mathematical modeling is the art of translating real systems, often physical or economic, into the language of mathematics in an attempt to predict future behavior of the system. Doing this often requires making many simplifying assumptions which are “unwarranted” from a purely logical perspective, but make the problems tractable. Therefore mathematical modeling is a distinct (but related) skill from the modern conception of the practice of mathematics.

A “parametric equation” is difficult to define exactly, but it is often (as it is here) a method for producing general surfaces or curves that cannot be described by functions because they do not pass the vertical line test. More specifically for this example, it is a function from a line segment into a higher-dimensional space.

This object has inspired me to get off my lazy butt and start producing content for the blog again. It also happens to be an excellent source of mathematical content: I’m probably going to be doing a daily series of posts about it for a while. I know I have content for at least three days and probably a few more besides.

It is vaguely related to epicycles, but the name “generalized epicycle” is my own invention. If you know an actually recognized name, I would love to know about it!

(EDIT: There is an old version of this post in which the constant terms were omitted and there were some flopped sin/cos symbols. I’m sorry! These haven’t been edited by someone else unlike many of the proofs I post so they’re bound to be a little rough around the edges every so often.)

(via freshphotons)

11:51pm
12,378 notes
Reblogged from 30000fps

(Source: 30000fps, via planetaryfolklore)

January 31, 2014 at 4:21pm
1 note

Douglas Quin - Weddell Seals (Underwater) (by timeowthy)