spooky{abstr}action

April 23, 2014 at 5:11pm
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There are three famous quotes that haunt me and guide me though my days. The first is from John Bradford, the 16th-century English reformer. In prison for inciting a mob, Bradford saw a parade of prisoners on their way to being executed and said, “There but for the grace of God go I.” (Actually, he said “There but for the grace of God goes John Bradford,” but the switch to the pronoun makes it work for the rest of us.) The second comes from Albert Einstein, who disparagingly referred to quantum entanglement as “spooky action at a distance.” And for the third, I go to Ice Cube, the chief lyricist of N.W.A., who delivered this manifesto in “Gangsta Gangsta” back in 1988: “Life ain’t nothing but bitches and money.

— Questlove on How Hip-Hop Failed Black America — Vulture

February 3, 2014 at 11:57pm
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Reblogged from proofsareart

proofsareart:

The image is not mine. It is a fantastic creation by bigblueboo that has caught some attention outside of the usual math tumblverse. You should definitely check out eir blog and if you like this post you should (also?) reblog the original. With that out of the way:

Modeling. Mathematical modeling is the art of translating real systems, often physical or economic, into the language of mathematics in an attempt to predict future behavior of the system. Doing this often requires making many simplifying assumptions which are “unwarranted” from a purely logical perspective, but make the problems tractable. Therefore mathematical modeling is a distinct (but related) skill from the modern conception of the practice of mathematics.

A “parametric equation” is difficult to define exactly, but it is often (as it is here) a method for producing general surfaces or curves that cannot be described by functions because they do not pass the vertical line test. More specifically for this example, it is a function from a line segment into a higher-dimensional space.

This object has inspired me to get off my lazy butt and start producing content for the blog again. It also happens to be an excellent source of mathematical content: I’m probably going to be doing a daily series of posts about it for a while. I know I have content for at least three days and probably a few more besides.

It is vaguely related to epicycles, but the name “generalized epicycle” is my own invention. If you know an actually recognized name, I would love to know about it!

(EDIT: There is an old version of this post in which the constant terms were omitted and there were some flopped sin/cos symbols. I’m sorry! These haven’t been edited by someone else unlike many of the proofs I post so they’re bound to be a little rough around the edges every so often.)

(via freshphotons)

11:51pm
11,446 notes
Reblogged from 30000fps

(Source: 30000fps, via planetaryfolklore)

January 31, 2014 at 4:21pm
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Douglas Quin - Weddell Seals (Underwater) (by timeowthy)

January 21, 2014 at 11:35pm
13,596 notes
Reblogged from angulargeometry
angulargeometry:

Inner Sleep 1.

angulargeometry:

Inner Sleep 1.

1:19am
2 notes
(via Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds | Colossal)

(via Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds | Colossal)

December 29, 2013 at 7:42pm
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Reblogged from jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

Circle of Life
The genome of Gloeobacter violaceus, drawn as a gorgeous circular plot by visionary biological data artist Martin Krzywinski (from this paper). Within its concentric layers of information are buried genome composition, relation to other species, and overall genetic structure. It’s also very pretty.
Gloeobacter is an ancient photosynthetic bacterium that branched off the rest of the photosynthetic tree (including cyanobacteria and, later, plants) and has its own strange way of eating sunlight. 
Krzywinski’s informative and beautiful data visualizations are featured at Wired Science, check ‘em out: Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data

jtotheizzoe:

Circle of Life

The genome of Gloeobacter violaceus, drawn as a gorgeous circular plot by visionary biological data artist Martin Krzywinski (from this paper). Within its concentric layers of information are buried genome composition, relation to other species, and overall genetic structure. It’s also very pretty.

Gloeobacter is an ancient photosynthetic bacterium that branched off the rest of the photosynthetic tree (including cyanobacteria and, later, plants) and has its own strange way of eating sunlight. 

Krzywinski’s informative and beautiful data visualizations are featured at Wired Science, check ‘em out: Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data

(via freshphotons)

7:37pm
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Bernard Tschumi. L’invention du parc. Graphite 1984: 29

Bernard Tschumi. L’invention du parc. Graphite 1984: 29

December 25, 2013 at 1:55pm
210 notes
Reblogged from shishimora
shishimora:

Illustration by Daniel Mroz for The Cyberiad by Stanislaw Lem:
"No insults, please!" said Pugg. "For I am not your usual uncouth pirate, but refined and with a Ph.D., and therefore extremely high-strung."  

shishimora:

Illustration by Daniel Mroz for The Cyberiad by Stanislaw Lem:

"No insults, please!" said Pugg. "For I am not your usual uncouth pirate, but refined and with a Ph.D., and therefore extremely high-strung."  

(via 50watts)

1:49pm
13,653 notes
Reblogged from generalelectric

generalelectric:

The science of snowflakes explained in “Beyond the Microscope,” a GE science film from 1922. 

(via freshphotons)